How To Start A Fire With Wet Wood

“Answer me, O LORD, answer me, that this people may know that You, O LORD, are God, and that You have turned their heart back again.” 38 Then the fire of the LORD fell and consumed the burnt offering and the wood and the stones and the dust, and licked up the water that was in the trench. 39 When all the people saw it, they fell on their faces; and they said, “The LORD, He is God; the LORD, He is God.” ( 1 Kings 18:37-39 NASB)

Along the Mediterranean coastline of Israel to the north, there is a parcel of land that jettisons out into the sea. From an aerial view, it makes a thumb-like figure in the silhouette of Israel’s border. This unique geographical idiosyncrasy makes up the biblical location of Mt. Carmel.

When you observe the coastline, Mt. Carmel breaks up the monotony of Israel’s coastline. It also brought about a major change in the spiritual monotony Israel experienced during the days of Elijah.

It was upon this mountain that Elijah revealed a phenomenon of starting a fire with wet wood that would spark a revival in the lives of God’s people. For several years the children of Israel succumb to chasing after the world’s god, Baal. He appealed to them and was attractive to worship because he was thought to bring fertility to the land and to their families.

Strangely, he (Baal) was the opposite of what the Israelites had understood about Yahweh because He had been associated with the desert. You can see why a god like Baal was appealing if you had been associated with the Desert God, Yahweh. It also made sense because where Baal was being served was located in the lush green area of Galilee.

The temptation to follow such a god like Baal overtook Israel as they began to give in to the seduction of this Canaanite god. Little did they know, that God would prove to them who really provided the rain. So, God sent Elijah to rebuke King Ahab and to reveal that it would not rain for what would ultimately become the space of 3 1/2 years.

It would ultimately be upon Mt. Carmel that Elijah, God’s man would contend with the prophets of Baal. The contest would prove who is truly the God that can provide life. Elijah was a gentleman and allowed the prophets of Baal to cry out first according to 1st Kings 18, but he would then exploit their ignorance and powerlessness by proving the power of God.

Elijah upon Mt. Carmel taught the Canaanites and the Israelites how to start a fire with wet wood. We, perhaps, could learn this lesson as well in a day of spiritual drought and desperate need for revival.

3 Ingredients Needed to Start a Fire with Wet Wood.

  1. Ingredient #1 – Fiery Faith
    1. According to 1st Kings 18:21-24 Elijah had a fiery faith to challenge the prophets of Baal. He had faith to believe first that Baal would fail. He then had bold faith to believe God would succeed.
  2. Ingredient #2 – Fervent Prayer
    1. We then see that Elijah prayed a fervent prayer to God in faith. We read in 1st Kings 18:36-37
      1. At the time of the offering of the evening sacrifice, Elijah the prophet came near and said, “O LORD, the God of Abraham, Isaac and Israel, today let it be known that You are God in Israel and that I am Your servant and I have done all these things at Your word. 37 “Answer me, O LORD, answer me, that this people may know that You, O LORD, are God, and that You have turned their heart back again.”
  3. Ingredient #3 – Flaming Obedience
    1. Finally, in 1st Kings 18:36b we observe Elijah’s obedience, ” …today let it be known that You are God in Israel and that I am Your servant and I have done all these things at Your word.” (Emphasis mine)

I am persuaded that if we are going to experience a revival like Elijah and see the presence of God fall in our lives we must indeed have these three ingredients. So, let us press on and let the fire fall!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s